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What are the spots?carbon dioxide emissionsfuel costs They show the relative Cost Savings and Reduced CO2 emissions.

Money
Saving
Tips
 Energy 
Savings 
Each Year
 Money
Savings
Each Year
 CO2
Savings
Each Year
 Comments
dishwasher energy saving tips Dishwashers
Read More
30kWh -
90kWh
£4.62 -
£13.86

circle
11.01kg -
33.03kg
circle

Run the machine full and less often

boil less water in kettle energy saving tips Boiling Water
Read More
82kWh -
164kWh
£12.628 -
£25.256

circle
30.09kg -
60.19kg
circle

Boil only what you need. Savings depend on how much tea you drink!

fridge freezer energy saving tips Fridge Freezers
Read More
50kWh -
400kWh
£7.7 -
£61.6

circle
18.35kg -
146.8kg
circle

Fridge maintenance. Savings depend on size, age and rating

dmoney saving tips tumble drying Tumble Dryers
Read More
90kWh -
350kWh
£13.86 -
£53.9

circle
33.03kg -
128.45kg
circle

Operate Less often, clean filters, part dry clothes?

differnce in cost of shallow or deep bath Baths
Read More
700kWh -
1400kWh
£30.1 -
£215.6

circle
147kg -
513.8kg
circle

Have shallower baths and consider how you heat water

change energy supplier to save money Change Supplier
Read More
0kWh -
0kWh
£0 -
£500

circle
0 -
0
circle

save money and have a beerSwitch! This is the single simplest way of saving money. This is equivalent to 100 pints of beer!

shower or power shower which is cheaper Shower of Power Shower
Read More
120kWh -
1100kWh
£18.48 -
£242

circle
25.2kg -
403.7kg
circle

Aviod immersion heated power showers

save money and energy with good loft insulation Install Loft Insulation
Read More
3000kWh -
3750kWh
£129 -
£161.25

circle
630kg -
787.5kg
circle

Modern loft insulation in a 3 bed semi - these numbers are for Gas, savings are greater for other fuels

save money and energy with good loft insulation Improve Loft Insulation
Read More
1000kWh -
1500kWh
£43 -
£64.5

circle
210kg -
315kg
circle

Modern loft insulation in a 3 bed semi - these numbers are for Gas, savings are greater for other fuels

This table is under construction there are more tips here.

Please use comments below or
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Televisions

Last Updated on Thursday, 12 October 2017 10:31





television
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Televisions

How much does it cost to have a tv on for 1 hour?

The running costs of TVs vary greatly depending on a number of factors:-

Screen size

The bigger the screen, the more energy is required, the higher the running costs

Type of TV

There are the very old cathode ray tube (CRT) televisions, there are not too many of these still operational, Plasma TVs, LCD TVs, LED TVs and more recently OLED TVs. Plasma TVs use a lot more energy than LCD TVs and LED TVs and are therefore more expensive to run for a given screen size. LED TV’s are not a completely new format of TV- they are an updated version of the previous LCD generation. LED use the same technology as an LCD TV, but instead of being illuminated by a florescent bulb from behind, they are lit by a more energy efficient array of LEDs (light emitting diodes). OLED TV's are different to LEDs, OLED stands for ‘Organic Light Emitting Diode’ they use ‘organic’ materials to create light when supplied directly by an electric current. Unlike LED/LCD screens, an OLED TV doesn’t require a backlight to illuminate the set area. Without this restriction of an external light source, OLED screens can be super thin and flexible.

Technology

High Definition (HD and UHD) TVs contain more pixels, have better resolution and picture quality but they cost a little more to run. However some features such as autobrightness can help to increase energy efficiency.


How much does it cost to run a TV for 1 hour, the table below provides a guide to annual running costs of different sizes and types of TV.

TV Power Consumption 1 Hour Running Cost
Screen Size (inches) OLED LED LCD PLASMA CRT
15" N/A 15W
£0.002
25W
£0.004
N/A 65W
£0.01
17" N/A 18W
£0.003
30W
£0.005
N/A 75W
£0.012
19" N/A 20W
£0.003
35W
£0.005
N/A 80W
£0.012
20" N/A 24W
£0.004
40W
£0.006
N/A 90W
£0.014
22" N/A 30W
£0.005
45W
£0.007
N/A 110W
£0.017
24" N/A 40W
£0.006
60W
£0.009
N/A 120W
£0.018
27" N/A 45W
£0.007
70W
£0.011
N/A 150W
£0.023
30" N/A 50W
£0.008
80W
£0.012
150W
£0.023
N/A
37" N/A 60W
£0.009
100W
£0.015
180W
£0.028
N/A
42" N/A 80W
£0.012
120W
£0.018
220W
£0.034
N/A
50" N/A 100W
£0.015
150W
£0.023
300W
£0.046
N/A
60+" 140W
£0.022
140W
£0.022
N/A 400W
£0.062
N/A

The above figures are only guidelines and there will be variations within different screen size categories depending on product specifications, however as a general rule buying a smaller screen will save you money on your electricity bill and the TV is cheaper to buy as well ! Below are a few tips to consider in addition to screen size when buying a TV:-

  • Check out the power consumption in the technical specification. This will usually be stated in Watts. The higher this figure the greater the energy consumption and the greater the running costs. Use our simple calculator 1 in the left column to estimate TV running costs, just put in the Watts figure and the number of viewing hours per day and it will tell you the approximate annual cost:-
  • Lookout for TVs with power saving features. For example some LCDs give you the ability to adjust the intensity of the backlight which can reduce power consumption. Others have specific power saving modes. These options make the TV less bright but it can improve image quality if the room lighting is lower.

The table below provides a guide to annual running costs of different sizes and types of TV. These figures are based on watching an average of 5 hours TV per day.

Power Consumption Annual running costs (Carbon Dioxide Emissions)
Screen Size (inches) OLED LED LCD PLASMA CRT
15" N/A 15W
£4.219 (10.1kg)
25W
£7.031 (16.8kg)
N/A 65W
£18.281 (43.6kg)
17" N/A 18W
£5.062 (12.1kg)
30W
£8.437 (20.1kg)
N/A 75W
£21.093 (50.3kg)
19" N/A 20W
£5.625 (13.4kg)
35W
£9.843 (23.5kg)
N/A 80W
£22.499 (53.6kg)
20" N/A 24W
£6.75 (16.1kg)
40W
£11.25 (26.8kg)
N/A 90W
£25.312 (60.3kg)
22" N/A 30W
£8.437 (20.1kg)
45W
£12.656 (30.2kg)
N/A 110W
£30.937 (73.7kg)
24" N/A 40W
£11.25 (26.8kg)
60W
£16.875 (40.2kg)
N/A 120W
£33.749 (80.4kg)
27" N/A 45W
£12.656 (30.2kg)
70W
£19.687 (46.9kg)
N/A 150W
£42.186 (100.5kg)
30" N/A 50W
£14.062 (33.5kg)
80W
£22.499 (53.6kg)
150W
£42.186 (100.5kg)
N/A
37" N/A 60W
£16.875 (40.2kg)
100W
£28.124 (67kg)
180W
£50.624 (120.6kg)
N/A
42" N/A 80W
£22.499 (53.6kg)
120W
£33.749 (80.4kg)
220W
£61.873 (147.5kg)
N/A
50" N/A 100W
£28.124 (67kg)
150W
£42.186 (100.5kg)
300W
£84.373 (201.1kg)
N/A
60+" 140W
£39.374 (93.8kg)
140W
£39.374 (93.8kg)
N/A 400W
£112.497 (268.1kg)
N/A
TV Energy Saving Tips...

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0 # HD costs more to run?Guest 2012-10-20 23:40
I find it doubtful that HD costs more to run. HD is essentially, as you say, smaller pixels. Pixels are what is used to build the on-screen image -- say, to represent a white circle. Now, the smaller the pixels, the more accurate that representation will be -- you will not need as many pixels to represent the same thing, because they hug the circle boundary more closely. Additionally, HD screen technology is newer, and should benefit from smaller, more efficient microelectronic s, more modern ideas about power saving, etc.Now, you could argue that most HD TVs usually come with small computers, freeview decoders, sometimes faster screen updates, etc. In that case, they would certainly cost more. However, you are no longer comparing like for like, as you're getting extra features in that sort of HD.
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